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Options for Sedation at Kitsap Kid’s Dentistry

SEDATION-DENTISTRY

We are frequently asked about sedation options for treatment at our office. Maybe you are concerned that your child might be nervous during their treatment appointment, or maybe you are more worried about your child experiencing pain, discomfort, or even about their ability to sit through an hour long procedure. There are many reasons that parents inquire about options for sedation, and our office offers several. At our office, it is always our objective to partner with parents in choosing options for treatment that are suited to each individual child. We know that not all kiddos are the same, and that works well for one child may not for another. Among the options for sedation we offer for patients at our office are nitrous oxide, conscious sedation medications like versed or valium, and treatment under general anesthesia.

Some children are given nitrous oxide/oxygen, or what you may know as laughing gas, to relax them for their dental treatment. Nitrous oxide/oxygen is a blend of two gases, oxygen and nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide/oxygen is given through a small breathing mask which is placed over the child’s nose, allowing them to relax, but without putting them to sleep. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, recognizes this technique as a very safe, effective technique to use for treating children’s dental needs. The gas is mild, easily taken, then with normal breathing, it is quickly eliminated from the body. It is non-addictive. While inhaling nitrous oxide/oxygen, your child remains fully conscious and keeps all natural reflexes.

Conscious Sedation is recommended for apprehensive children, very young children, and children with special needs. It is used to calm your child and to reduce the anxiety or discomfort associated with dental treatments. Your child may be quite drowsy, and may even fall asleep, but they will not become unconscious.

There are a variety of different medications, which can be used for conscious sedation. The doctor will prescribe the medication best suited for your child’s overall health and dental treatment recommendations. We will be happy to answer any questions you might have concerning the specific drugs we plan to give to your child.

After the sedation appointment, your child will be drowsy and will need to be monitored very closely. Keep your child away from areas of potential harm and monitor them closely for the remainder of the day.

 

Because we use local anesthetic to numb your child’s mouth during the procedure, your child may have the tendency to bite or chew their lips, cheeks, and/or tongue and/or rub and scratch their face after treatment. Please observe your child carefully to prevent any injury to these areas.

Outpatient General Anesthesia is recommended for apprehensive children, very young children, and children with special needs that would not work well under conscious sedation or I.V. sedation. General anesthesia renders your child completely asleep. This would be the same as if he/she was having their tonsils removed, ear tubes, or hernia repaired. This is performed in a hospital or outpatient setting only. While the assumed risks are greater than that of other treatment options, if this is suggested for your child, the benefits of treatment this way have been deemed to outweigh the risks. Most pediatric medical literature places the risk of a serious reaction in the range of 1 in 25,000 to 1 in 200,000, far better than the assumed risk of even driving a car daily. The inherent risks if this is not chosen are multiple appointments, potential for physical restraint to complete treatment and possible emotional and/or physical injury to your child in order to complete their dental treatment. The risks of NO treatment include tooth pain, infection, swelling, the spread of new decay, damage to their developing adult teeth and possible life threatening hospitalization from a dental infection.

If you are interested in a sedation option for your child’s treatment, please let the doctor know at the time of treatment diagnosis or prior to your child’s treatment procedure. We would love to discuss our sedation options with you!


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